1st May 057‘Stepping the Tinners Way’ Public Walk 2010

Find out more about this creative art project on our website here

The Tinners Way started off as a Bronze Age trading route of tin and copper. It is an 18 mile track that covers 20 prehistoric and Christian sites tracing as closely as possible the ancient paths along which tin and copper were transported from St Just to St Ives bay.

The present Tinners Way is a recreational walk beginning in the St Just area taking us across the high moors, finishing in St Ives. The route passes by ancient landmarks such as Carn Kenidjack, Chun Castle, the Iron Age settlement of Bodrifty.

It is of interest to us as a key heritage feature that embodies a rich historic,social and industrial past. It is a direct resource that can teach us a about how people lived and inform us about our present, strengthening our sense of place.

As part of the Stepping the Tinners Way project Tough Dough planned a celebratory walk of the Tinners Way on May the 3rd 2010. Two guided walks started from St Ives and Cape Cornwall and finished at Bodrifty settlement where a celebration tea party took place in the Bodrifty Roundhouse. The walk and event were funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund and Feast.

At 9am on Monday morning 27 walkers met at Cape Cornwall lead by Bill Lakin from Geevor Tin Mine and Museum to follow the ancient trading route used by traders, tribes and miners since the bronze age. The path took the walkers throught the ruined mine workings of Kenidjack and up to Carn Kenidjack where they discovered holed stones and stone circles. When they reached Carn Kenidjack sometimes called the Hooting Carn by locals due to it’s eery noise made on stormy nights, they met more walkers who joined the group to Chun Castle. On reaching Bosullow, Ian Cooke a local historian and writer led the walkers onto Men and Tol and the Nine Maidens where we learned about pagan rituals and the concerns of ‘Save Penwith Moors’. On passing the Four Parish Stone which is a point which marks the four parishes of Madron, Morvah, Madron and Zennor we made our way to Bodrifty Settlement once home to a Bronze age community living in stone huts with thatched roves.

Meanwhile walkers from St Ives hadmade their way from St Ives Leisure Centre where 45 walkers met with organiser Alessandra Ausenda and Paul Bonnington a local Archaeologist. The walk from the east took the group out of the town to Consols roundhouse and up onto the high moors. They visited Zennor Quoit where Paul shed light on life in ancient times and ………

The owners of Bodrifty Roundhouse have created a replica building in their grounds. This was the venue for the tea party and a group of volunteers from Nancledra School, Madron Community Forum prepared cakes, tea and an art activity. The walkers relaxed beneath the sunlit glade of grass next to the roundhouse and rested there weary feet . The walkers were serenaded by the sounds of Ruth Wall who played her harp to the crowd that had gathered. Families and public arrived at Bodrifty by car to join in the celebration. The West Cornwall Community Buses arrived and volunteer drivers gradually shuttled the walkers back across Penwith to their cars and homes. It was all agreed that everyone had an excellent day out ‘ Stepping the Tinners Way’.

 

Tough Dough engaged with schools and communities along the Tinners Way looking at the history and heritage as well more contemporary issues affecting us today. We worked with art practitioners, historians, archaeologists and relevant experts, film makers and teachers. Volunteers of all age groups were involved from the start. Tough Dough worked in partnership with galleries, museums, arts organisations and charities.

The four schools that took part made four animated films reflecting on different themes relating to the path (see schools work). Tough Dough organised walks, creative writing sessions with Anna Murphy, talks, tea treats (see Tea Treats) and art workshops for each school to develop creative art work for the films. A celebratory event was held at the end of the project showcasing the film and related work at Geevor Tin Mine and Museum.

 

As part of the Stepping the Tinners Way project in Penwith Tough Dough invited experts to visit communities and talk at Landithy Hall in Madron. The 18 mile track covers 20 prehistoric and Christian sites. The present Tinners Way is a recreational walk beginning in the St Just area taking us across the high moors, finishing in St Ives. The route passes by ancient landmarks such as Carn Kenidjack, Chun Castle, the Iron Age settlement of Bodrifty.

Paul Bonnington a geologist and local expert told the audience about the significance of the trail and the importance of the ancient sites. Craig Weatherhill , writer and historian entertained his audience with stories and legends from the Tinners Way. The talks were accompanied by slide shows showing photographs of the trail.